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ligne h240" Stage directing is the art of making sense of it all. But how can we make sense of a fairy?
A ‘monster’ called Toto?
A carnivorous plant?
Or a starving fish? "

André Laliberté, artistic director

ligne h240MARKETING
Anne-Valérie Côté
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Show available for special projects

 

Dear Fizzy

by Simon Boudreault

 

PRESENTATION

A letter that runs and bites — have you ever seen anything like it? An urgent letter, furious even! Sent by the Professional Order of Fairies, it has just been delivered to the Fairy. But what does it say? Ragou, the cantankerous magical mouse, believes that the Fairy will have her wand withdrawn. And then he will finally get his most cherished wish: to become the mouse of the Tooth Fairy. What will happen to Toto, that strange creature who is the product of one of the many botched spells of his beloved mistress? Time is running out – and this letter must be read! But will they be able to catch this speedy envelope?…

For its 21st production, Théâtre de l’Œil decided to entrust the script and the puppet design to two emergent artists, Simon Boudreault and Marie-Pierre Simard. The former is an author and actor while the latter is the first Quebec graduate in puppet design and manipulation from the École Supérieure Nationale des Arts de la Marionnette (ESNAM) in Charleville-Mézières, France. They were puppeteers with the company when André Laliberté, the Artistic Director, suggested to work together on a new production.

To start off with, these three artists with different experiences, styles and ages tapped into stories and ancient myths. They re-read the fairy tales of Anderson and the brothers Grimm. They were inspired by the world of fairies and used the whimsical nature of the characters to create a zany tale where anything is possible with magic.

La Félicité premiered in Montreal on the stage of the Maison Théâtre in October 2002. The English version, Dear Fizzy met its first audience at New York’s New Victory Theater in May 2004.


CREDITS

Original Concept
Simon Boudreault, André Laliberté, Marie-Pierre Simard

Script
Simon Boudreault

Translation
Bobby Theodore

Director 
André Laliberté

Puppet Design 
Marie-Pierre Simard

 

Set, Props and Costume Design
Richard Lacroix

Music
Libert Subirana

Lighting
Gilles Perron

Make-up
Florence Cornet

Assistant Director
Simon Boudreault


CHARACTERS

Illustrations: Marie-Pierre Simard

fee   lettre    ragou 


Fairy Fizzy
A unconventional bumbling fairy who has a tendency to bungle her spells, but who is also very likeable.

 


Letter
Who would believe that a simple envelope sent out by the Fairy Headquarters could cause such a commotion?

 


Ragou
A grey rat masquerading as a large mouse.

         
toto   Vege   PlumeLumo


Toto
An undefinable cross between a monkey and a musical instrument.

 


Vegetarian
A carnivorous plant who loves to bite ears and tails.

 


Plume & Lumo
Gossipy dusters who like to dance the tango.

 

 

 

 

 

Sushi        


Sushi
A punk fish with a collar of metal spikes.

 

 

   

PRESS REVIEWS

What I wrote ten years ago still stands: this is a totally oddball story told in an irresistible way. André Laliberté's stage direction unfolds at an astounding pace […] There are some things that age better than others… "

Michel Bélair, Le Devoir, February 20, 2012
(Translation: Denise Babin & Graham Soul)

 La Félicité has enjoyed a distinguished journey since its premiere at the Maison Théâtre a dozen years ago, including a Canadian tour and a stop in New York as its English version (Dear Fizzy). One constant is undeniable: this "anti-fairy tale”, staged by André Laliberté with the help of Simon Boudreault, is still charming children and adults alike. With themes of tolerance, friendship and the acceptance of differences, this joyous play written by Boudreault – his first career immersion into the world of puppetry – proposes several smaller stories within one main plotline: the first about a fairy, then about a toad who loves a woman or the Great Fracasse and his travelling show with actors… who have disappeared. And yet the narrative thread remains clear and does not get muddled: each tale has its importance and its place at the heart of the main story. "

David Lefebvre, Mon(Theatre).qc.ca, February 17, 2012
(Translation: Graham Soul)

" Expert puppetry and kindly storytelling combine to deliver a message of friendship in an imperfect world in "Dear Fizzy"... "

Lawrence Van Gelder, The New York Times, May 20, 2004

" Inventive puppeteers perform dazzling show …Simon Boudreault (text), André Laliberté (direction), Marie-Pierre Simard (puppet creator) and Libert Subirana (music) with the help of Richard Lacroix's inventive fairy's den of a decor, pave the way for the puppeteers, including Simard, to execute a gentle, enjoyable story about the nature of family, belonging and true frienship."

Kathryn Greenaway, The Gazette, October 18, 2002

" … l'équipe d'André Laliberté travaille avec le théâtre d'ombre … […] C'est une fort bonne idée, rendue de façon extrèmement efficace : les petits spectateurs ont été séduits par le procédé dans l'histoire mise en écran devant eux. La mise en scène d'André Laliberté est comme toujours follement soignée, les "effets spéciaux et accessoires" sont tout à fait réussis et encore une fois, l'imagination délirante souvent tétrahydro-cannabinolesque du Théâtre de l'Œil réussira à séduire les plus difficile. "

Michel Bélair, Le Devoir, October 16, 2002

" The story is told by means of numerous techniques, like a highly attractive shadow theatre and a three-dimensional book [...] And the magic works, thanks to a healthy pinch of humour that Simon Boudreault has sprinkled throughout this zany tale... "

Catherine Hébert, Voir, October 10-16, 2002

" [...] the story line of the show remains lucid. The characterisation of the personages is strong and clear, without locking the oddball characters into exaggerated stereotypes.

The production succeeds in captivating the spectators by a clever marriage of traditional and new techniques. The 5 to 10 year-olds seem equally impressed by the screen which is transformed into a mini puppet theatre and by the good old animated book whose pages tell the terrible adventures of Fracasse and his circus animals. "

Ève Dumas, La Presse, October 5th, 2002